Recommended Viewing : HazelCast Intro, Management Center and an Example

If you have been following HazelCast, you know it is one of the most interesting of startups. If you haven’t and you are working on big data applications or looking at in-memory grid solutions – you should look at Hazelcast.

haz03Hazelcast has a Community Edition, an Enterprise Edition and a Management Center.  Hazelcast  is an open source clustering and highly scalable data distribution platform. Hazelcast allows you to easily share and partition your application data across your cluster. Hazelcast is a peer-to-peer solution (there is no master node, every node is a peer) so there is no single point of failure.

 

Hazelcast Enterprise Edition (EE) is an extension to Community Edition. It contains extra features such as Elastic Memory and Security. Elastic memory helps businesses on storing large amounts of data with high throughput. The off-heap technology used in enterprise version, resolves the performance problems experienced handling terabytes of data. With Enterprise Edition, big data will not be a big challenge.

– from the Hazelcast web site.

JVMs running Hazelcast will dynamically cluster. Miko Matsumora has two nice videos on Hazelcast In-Memory Grid technologies. In the first one he gives a quick intro to HazelCast :

And in the second video shows how to set-up the HazelCast Management Center and walks you through it :

Finally there is a nice blog on how to get started with HazelCast that walks you through a simple example.

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and a nice presentation (PDF) from Team High Calibre at San Jose State University :

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Recommended Reading : Getting Started with Hazelcast

hazelcast02I just got my hands on a new book, Getting Started with Hazelcast.  The book covers how to get started with Hazelcast, how to leverage concurrency in your application, how to build solutions using a divide-and-conquer strategy, using REST and a number of other topics.  If you are interested in getting started in building distributed solutions you should look at this book.  I got through Amazon as a Kindle book – which I read on my Mac desktop using the Kindle Reader.  This is not a bad way to get started with Hazelcast.

Recommended Viewing/Reading : Hazelcast’s Distributed, Java-Based In-Memory Grid

On this one, you really need to pay attention. It is a really impressive in-memory grid software.  This is new in-memory grid that provides you with a nice way to share your data among many servers, cache data, cluster and more.  Five banks already using this in-memory grid to boost their applications.  

Hazelcast is a new and interesting new distributed in-memory grid framework. It is an open source clustering and highly scalable data distribution platform for Java, which is:

  • Memory-fast; thousands of operations/sec.
  • Fail-safe; no losing data after crashes.
  • Dynamically scales as new servers added.
  • Super-easy to use; include a single jar.

The JavaOne 2013 Hazelcast in-memory grid talk, Hazelcast Scalable Data Structures:

Let start simply with the first, very simple and basic demo.

Hazelcast allows you to easily share and partition your application data across your cluster. Hazelcast is a peer-to-peer solution (there is no master node, every node is a peer) so there is no single point of failure.  In the next demo,  Hazelcast Elastic Memory on 100 AWS nodes, storing 4 TB data in-memory. More that 1.3M distributed operations per second with minimal GC effect. The data is stored off the heap.

What can you use Hazelcast for ? Think :

  • Share data/state among many servers (e.g. web session sharing)
  • Cache your data (distributed cache)
  • Cluster your application
  • Provide secure communication among servers
  • Partition your in-memory data
  • Distribute workload onto many servers
  • Take advantage of parallel processing
  • Provide fail-safe data management

All of this while supporting Java transactions, publish/subscribe messaging, distributed java.util.{ Queue, Set, List, Map, concurrency.locks.Lock, concurrent.ExecutorService }, dynamic scaling, dynamic discovery, dynamic partition with backups, dynamic fail-over, write-through and write-behind persistence for maps and quite a bit more.

An interview with Hazelcast’s CEO and team member from JavaOne 2013 :

 

 

Update :   Since this was published – a nice tweet from Hazelcast.

Update