Climbing Over the Walls You Have Built : Extending Your Corporate Network to the Cloud (Part 1)

The move to the cloud is on.  Increasingly, even companies that are mandated to comply with various corporate and national privacy and security standards, such as HIPAA, are also looking at ways they can extend their company networks to include auto-scaling clouds while at the same time abiding by those security standards.  With the availability of sophisticated cloud diaglayersproviders such as AWS, Azure, Joyent and others it is increasingly attractive for companies to figure out ways to leverage these cloud providers and burst out of the corporate networks and transparently use these clouds.

In thinking about this, it becomes of interest to figure out the “how-to” of doing this. A number of cloud providers continue to work on being able to stretch on-premise with cloud. We can look at what Microsoft Azure has been doing to figure out why companies are looking at a merge of on-premises datacenter and cloud. They have provided an example of how a company could extend their on-premises datacenter with the Azure Cloud.  In their informational diagram it is possible to turn on and off information bits within the the datacenter/cloud architecture. They allow for turning on and off information layers as can be seen from the figure above. You can see the example in the image below.

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The above cloud represents an example of how companies can now merge the Azure cloud and their company network securely. You can find more details on this at the link below.

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There are all sorts of challenges but companies like Microsoft are increasingly delivering ways to securely extend corporate networks into auto-scaling clouds.

Another company that allows bursting to the cloud is Cloudian.  Their focus on providing an enterprise hybrid cloud allows corporate networks to connect safely with clouds. In Cloudian’s case, their product, HyperStore, combined with the Amazon cloud, allows for a next-generation hybrid IT cloud. The Cloudian/Amazon combination allows a 100 percent S3-compliant hybrid cloud storage platform. Dynamic migration from on-premises physical storage to off-premises cloud storage allows near infinite capacity scaling to meet the security and cost requirements of enterprise environments. Service providers who provide multi-SLA storage services are also benefited by this hybrid structure. You can read more about it :

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In the next  extending-into-the-cloud post, we will look at extending Microsoft SQL Server into the cloud.  SQL Server 2016, when it arrives,  it will encrypt all data by default, and is integrated with the R statistical programming language. More interestingly it allows a stretch into the Azure cloud.  More on this in the next post.  In the post that follows we will also discuss HIPAA cloud providers and whether they can remain relevant in the face of substantial improvement in merging the on-premises networks with clouds.

Fusion IO Flash Storage Accelerates In-Memory SQL Server 2014 Database up to 4x

Fusion IO has jumped on-board the Microsoft SQL Server 2014 in-memory features and has claimed up to 4x improvements in transaction per second and substantial reduction in data latencies.  A nice little Fusion IO video that introduces SQL Server 2014:

Fusion ioMemory integrates into the SQL Server 2014 database engine buffer pool to improve IO throughput. The lower price points of the PCIe flash card products will no doubt put pressure on flash arrays.

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Fusion IO has written a nice white paper detailing how their cards accelerate SQL Server 2014 by leveraging the new In-Memory features. Using their ioDrive2 Duo cards they substantially accelerated the performance, latency of transactions.

fio101The performance brief shows an increase of 4.4 x more transaction with the ioDrive2 Duo 2.4TB versus an enterprise class disk array. It also shows that it delivers better latency – serving customers up to 73% faster and delivers 3.3x faster database startup times.

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Here is a SQL Server 2014 In-Memory OLTP Overview :

 

Data Points : Microsoft SQL Server on Flash Storage – Data Reduction Matters

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Data Points is a type of post on this blog focused on showing use cases and metrics that suggest a point. Previously I mentioned how important in-line de-duplication and compression are in saving considerable space. These are two data reduction technologies found in many flash storage systems. A third is thin-provisioning. 

The company, Mattersight, is an software-as-a-service enterprise analytics company. They help customers capture analyze millions of human interactions.  They improved the overall performance of their analytics process by 9.6 times. But consider this, if they had not been able to leverage data reduction (which takes the form of in-line de-duplication, compression and thin-provisioning) they would not have made another significant saving – their database before was a 600 GB database. After they put it on a Pure Storage array that leveraged in-line  data reduction – it was reduced to 65 GB.  You can find more information here.

Pure Storage, like SolidFire and Hitachi, has a good story to tell on data reduction and it advertises this strength pointing out that the array suddenly becomes 5 to 10 times larger with in-line data reduction. And they are right. They highlight this with a de-dup ticker which shows the savings across every Pure Storage flash array and a comparison with other competitors. It is worth looking at their data reduction page because it highlights what many people overlook – these technologies dramatically increase the size of the array’s storage capacity.

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gotostorageGo to more posts on storage and flash storage blogs at http://digitalcld.com/cld/category/storage.